Best Motorcycle Roads and Destinations in Arkansas, USA

Best Motorcycle Roads and Destinations in Arkansas, USA

Posted by Arnish Rhine on Aug 24th 2021

Best Motorcycle Roads and Destinations in Arkansas, USA

The life of a motorcyclist should be one filled with constant adventure. Traveling across hundreds of miles with the wind roaring in your ears. Struggling to stay balanced as you navigate unfamiliar territory just to feel adrenaline pumping through your veins. Moments like these are the kind of experiences that help you create lasting memories with your motorcycle. However, you cannot find this sort of gratification if you keep riding down familiar highways only. What you need is an out-of-state getaway that will let you utilize the full capabilities of your bike.

Arkansas or “The Natural State” is the perfect setting for motorcyclists looking to have fun on an extended tour. Because much of the state’s natural beauty is left untouched, there are plenty of forests, hills, mountains, lakes, streams, valleys, and plains to admire while on the road. Speaking of roads, there are plenty of well-known ones that stretch out across the state. Each of them has plenty of natural and homely attractions for you to visit. Of course, you have to know where to look and how to get there first.

Before you can actually decide which destinations you would like to go to, you need to prepare your supplies and get to know Arkansas’ motorcycle laws. As a tourist, you have to be sure that you have the tools needed for emergencies and know how to avoid getting in trouble with the Arizona Highway Patrol.

This article focuses on teaching you the essential sections about motorcycle laws, the type of luggage you should use to store belongings, and potential roads and destinations you may want to visit.

    • VikingBags Trianon Large Triple Strap Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • VikingBags Trianon Large Triple Strap Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • $454.99$349.99

    • Shop Now
    • VikingBags Americano Medium Double Strap Braided Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • VikingBags Americano Medium Double Strap Braided Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • $298.99$229.99

    • Shop Now
    • VikingBags Legacy Extra Large Double Strap Studded Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • VikingBags Legacy Extra Large Double Strap Studded Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • $584.99$449.99

    • Shop Now
    • VikingBags Char Denizen Large Side Pocket Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • VikingBags Char Denizen Large Side Pocket Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • $285.99$219.99

    • Shop Now

1. Motorcycle Laws in Arkansas:

Even if you are not a resident of Arkansas, you can be held responsible for any motorcycle-related misdemeanors that you commit. If you do not have good knowledge of the motorcycle laws in Arkansas, then you may end up in an uncomfortable confrontation with the Arkansas police. Arkansas can be very strict about wearing motorcycle safety gear, how your motorcycle is outfitted, how you behave on the road, and transporting passengers. Just make sure to be patient and careful on the road, especially if there are other vehicles sharing the road with you.

1.1 Helmet Laws:

If you are under the age of 21, you are legally obliged to wear a helmet. Even if you are the age of 21 or older, it is recommended you always wear a helmet when riding a motorcycle. You should use either an open-face helmet or a full-face helmet as both of them are approved for use by the Department of Transportation. You also need to wear additional eye protection such as safety glasses, goggles, face shields, or a helmet visor.

1.2 Required Safety Features:

Your motorcycle is required to have headlights, brake lights, a rear reflector, rearview mirrors, and turn signals. In Arkansas, you are only required to have one of the following features: the headlight, brake light, rear reflector, and rearview mirror. You can install an additional one of each utility if you wish to expand your field of vision, increase your visibility, and help your motorcycle run better. However, as it is not required by law, you only have to do so out of personal preference. It is suggested you have turn signals, but they do not have to be installed on your motorcycle in Arkansas. If you plan to ride without turn signals, you need to have complete knowledge of how to signal to other vehicles with your hands.

1.3 Lane Splitting Laws:

Arkansas is a state where there are no laws explicitly forbidding lane splitting, however there are also no laws that approve of lane splitting either. As a result, lane splitting is allowed. It is not recommended you practice it as doing so increases your chance of colliding with another vehicle. However, you are allowed to ride on the dividing lines or in between adjacent vehicles so long as you make your presence clear and there is enough space available. Keep in mind that you can still be pulled over by the Highway Patrol. Based on the Arkansas county you are in, you can still be held liable for reckless driving.

1.4 Passenger Laws:

If you plan to bring along a passenger, your motorcycle will need to install a seat and footholds similar to your own. The seat has to be placed either behind you or on the side of the motorcycle. If you decide on a side seat, you need to be sure that it is still positioned behind you. Your motorcycle cannot have more than 2 people riding at once. Any children that are below the age of 8 are not allowed to ride your motorcycle as a passenger. If you are below the age of 16, you are not allowed to transport a passenger. Your passenger has to follow the same helmet and eye protection laws as you do.

2. Motorcycle Luggage for Touring Trip:

    • VikingBags Lamellar Vale Extra Large Shock Cutout Leather Wrapped Motorcycle Hard Saddlebags

    • VikingBags Lamellar Vale Extra Large Shock Cutout Leather Wrapped Motorcycle Hard Saddlebags

    • $649.99$499.99

    • Shop Now
    • VikingBags Lamellar Vale Extra Large Shock Cutout Painted Motorcycle Hard Saddlebags

    • VikingBags Lamellar Vale Extra Large Shock Cutout Painted Motorcycle Hard Saddlebags

    • $714.99$549.99

    • Shop Now
    • VikingBags Lamellar Stallion Extra Large Painted Motorcycle Hard Saddlebags

    • VikingBags Lamellar Stallion Extra Large Painted Motorcycle Hard Saddlebags

    • $779.99$599.99

    • Shop Now
    • VikingBags Lamellar Blood Rider Large Leather Wrapped Motorcycle Hard Saddlebags

    • VikingBags Lamellar Blood Rider Large Leather Wrapped Motorcycle Hard Saddlebags

    • $519.99$399.99

    • Shop Now

As with any other kind of trip, you need to make sure to pack the essentials: food, money, devices, repair tools, etc. for your motorcycle tour. Considering you will likely be moving at high speeds over long periods of time, you need luggage suited to endure these conditions. Besides being long-lasting, your luggage also has to have enough space to arrange your belongings and be resistant to damage from the elements. When preparing your checklist of things you should bring, try to pack light. Being on a two-wheeled vehicle, keeping balance is essential to covering distance during acceleration and preventing your motorcycle from crashing. It is difficult to maintain balance if your luggage is carrying too much weight. Prioritize objects that have diverse functionality rather than convenience. To help you figure out which luggage is suited for your motorcycle model, here is a list for you to choose from:

Leather Saddlebags

Hard Saddlebags

Universal Saddlebags

Street Bike Saddlebags

Sissy Bar Bags

Swing Arm Bags

Tank Bags

Windshield Bags

Motorcycle Trunks

Tool/Fork Bags

Handlebar Bags

Backpack

Tail Bags

Seat Luggage

Roll Bags

Solo Bags

Organizers

3. Roads And Destinations in Arkansas:

Depending on which direction you enter Arkansas’ borders, some sites and routes may be closer to you than others. Based on how difficult the terrain is and the number of turns, the length of each route may differ. Some routes may only be a couple dozen miles while others could be stretched over a hundred miles. If you want to be efficient, try to reach the famous spots nearby that only require you to use the minimum amount of fuel. If you are more ambitious, see if you can complete the full distance of a route either one-way or roundtrip with minimal stops. Depending on how many days you plan to stay in Arkansas, you may be able to traverse enough of Arkansas to see most of the attractions you want. Even if you do not, there are enough roads for you to ride to your heart’s content.

3.1 The Arkansas Dragon:

Distance: 19 miles

Also referred to as “The Dragon Tail,” this section of Highway 123 got its name from the series of sharp swerves resembling a serpentine tail. Because of how far you have to turn to clear the swerves safely, your motorcycle’s maneuverability is better suited for this road compared to larger vehicles. This route is suggested for experienced motorcyclists due to how low to the ground you have to lean your ride. This route cuts through the Ozark National Forest. Further down the road, you can park your motorcycle off to the side so you can take a hike up to the top of Sam’s Throne or admire the beauty of the Highway 123 Falls.

3.2 Pig Trail:

Distance: 24 miles

Based on the nickname given to the University of Arkansas’ football team, the Razorbacks, this was a regular route used to travel to their stadium. It was also relied upon by both the Union and the Confederacy to relocate soldiers during the Civil War. This section of Highway 23 travels through the Boston Mountains region of the Ozarks Mountains. It also crosses over the Mulberry River where you can rent a paddleboat and the Ozark Highlands Trail where you can take a hike. If you want to further experience natural surroundings, you can cut through the Ozark National Forest and peek behind the curtain of the Pig Trail Falls.

3.3 Push Mountain Road:

Distance: 121 miles

This challenging climb runs along Highway 341, with many steep slopes and sudden turns that test the vigilance of even the most experienced riders. The road takes you through Mountain Home, a popular resort area. In Calico Rock, you can stop by the Calico Rock Museum to admire the art galleries. In Norfolk, you can get a look at the Jacob Wolf House if you are interested in seeing the first courthouse of Izard County.

3.4 Arkansas Highway 7:

Distance: 290 miles

Considered Arkansas’ first national scenic byway, this route travels through both the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains. A leisurely drive full of natural beauty, you can take a look inside the rocky interior of the Blanchard Spring Caverns and the Mystic Caverns. You can also relax at the Garvan Woodland Gardens, enjoying the light atmosphere created by the flowers, waterfalls, and wildlife. Near the botanical garden, you can stop by the town of Hot Springs to enjoy a good soak at their historic bathhouses.

3.5 Twisted Lady Route:

Distance: 126 miles

This route has a long history steeped in the Old West. Its name was inspired by the nickname given to notorious outlaw Belle Starr, Queen of the Outlaws. Supposedly, this route was how she met up with fellow outlaws Cole Younger, Jesse James, and Frank James. While going along the route, you can visit the grave of Frank James at Snow Cemetery. You could also head to the town of Parthenon to learn about the vigilante group known as the Baldknobbers. According to legend, gold that once belonged to the late Baldknobber Wash Gibbs is hidden somewhere in the region.

3.6 The Lost Mine Run:

Distance: 239 miles

The aforementioned mine in this route’s name is the Lost Silver Mine of Searcy County. The location of the precious silver had been forgotten over time following several conflicts between the Spaniards and Native Americans. If you are looking to kill some time watching a flick, you should grab a spot at the Kenda Drive-In Theater. You can also try your hand at fishing or paddleboarding if you go out on the water of Table Rock Lake. If you want an introduction to spelunking, check out the stalagmites and stalactites of the Mystic Caverns.

3.7 Ozark Moonshine Run:

Distance: 113 miles

Intersecting with Highway 7, this route travels deep into the heart of the Ozark Mountains. You get to breathe in the fresh air near the Buffalo National River and in the Boxley Valley. If you are lucky, you may be able to catch a glimpse of the elk living in the region. After you clear the mountains, the land begins to flatten out as you take in the sight of the farms near Harrison. Harrison is an ideal stop as there are hotels and restaurants available for you to rest from your travels.

3.8 Bull Shoals Dam Route:

Distance: 100 miles

Passing over a few bodies of water such as the Crooked Creek and the Bull Shoals Lake, this route eventually takes you to the Bull Shoals Dam. While out on the water of the Bull Shoals Lake, you can enjoy boating or fishing. Then, you can walk around and appreciate the greenery of Bull Shoals-White River State Park. Meanwhile, at James A. Gaston Visitor Center, named after Jim Gaston of Gaston’s White River Resort, you can get to know the history and wildlife of the White River, Bull Shoals Dam, and Bull Shoals Lake. The center is full of exhibits, an observation tower, a theater with informative videos, and a gift shop to browse through.

3.9 Eureka Springs Backroads:

Distance: 134 miles

This route will take you beside the Buffalo National River where you can admire the elk and the Lost Valley Trail if you want to do some hiking or camping. If you choose to go through Huntsville, you could go take a look at the house of Orval Faubus, the governor who had to deal with racial discrimination when the Little Rock Central High School became integrated. Or you could get a bite at Granny’s Kitchen and enjoy a classic home cooked meal. Your final destination is Eureka Springs, a Victorian-style city positioned in the Ozark Mountains.

    • VikingBags Char SS Large Padlock Single Strap Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • VikingBags Char SS Large Padlock Single Strap Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • $259.99$199.99

    • Shop Now
    • VikingBags Char SS Medium Padlock Single Strap Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • VikingBags Char SS Medium Padlock Single Strap Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • $181.99$139.99

    • Shop Now
    • VikingBags Vital Large Padlock Double Strap Studded Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • VikingBags Vital Large Padlock Double Strap Studded Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • $259.99$199.99

    • Shop Now
    • VikingBags Char Vital Large Padlock Double Strap Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • VikingBags Char Vital Large Padlock Double Strap Leather Motorcycle Saddlebags For Harley Softail Breakout 114 FXBRS

    • $272.99$209.99

    • Shop Now

3.10 Jasper Disaster:

Distance: 56 miles

Aptly named due to the sudden drops and narrow curves, this route forces you to exercise extreme caution and exert your body to its limit when maneuvering your ride up or down the highways. This road goes part way down Highway 7, climbs up through some of the Arkansas’ Grand Canyon, passes by the Elk Education Center in Ponca, and goes up the Gaither Mountain. You can also stop by the town of Jasper to restock on supplies and take a short break from traveling.

3.11 Peel Ferry Route:

Distance: 113 miles

This loop circles around through both Arkansas and Missouri. While still in Arkansas, you can ride over the hills of the Ozark plateaus. To avoid having to go the long way around the rivers dividing Arkansas and Missouri, the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department provided a ferry system to help carry motorcycles across the Bull Shoals Lake. The ferry ride is free to use and gives you a chance to take a breather after a long ride. When you finish crossing, you can continue into Missouri and visit towns such as Protem and Branson before returning to Arkansas via interstate highways.

3.12 Talimena Scenic Byway:

Distance: 54 miles

Though starting in Arkansas, the route eventually ends in Oklahoma. This route scales over the second-tallest mountain in Arizona, Rich Mountain and the less famous but equally challenging Winding Stair Mountain. You can pass through or stop to take a break in Queen Wilhelmina State Park. The surrounding area has restaurants and temporary housing. If you are interested in Western history, see the frequent haunt of the infamous Doolin Gang at the Horse Thief Spring Historic Site or enjoy a good scare at the spooky Rich Mountain Pioneer Cemetery.

3.13 Ozark Highlands Byway:

Distance: 35 miles

Cutting through the Boston Mountains region of the Ozark Mountains, this route runs parallel to the Pig Trail. The byway meets up with several bodies of water including the Buffalo National River, Kings River, White River, Mulberry River, and Big Piney Creek. It then intersects with the Ozarks Highlands Trail which is a hiking path used to get from the Ozark National Forest to the Buffalo National River.

3.14 Arkansas’ Grand Canyon:

Distance: 157 miles

Unlike its desert counterpart in Arizona, the valleys of this canyon are covered in thick foliage, giving you a pristine view of the Ozarks Mountains stretched out around you. The path surrounding the canyon travels by the Rotary Ann Roadside Park, Arkansas’ first roadside rest area. You may even get to see the elk that call the Buffalo National River and the Boxley Valley home. If you want to get an idea of the animals that live around here, you can look up further information at the Hilary Jones Wildlife Museum.

3.15 Wine Country Loop:

Distance: 122 miles

As the name suggests, this route loops through regions famous for producing Arkansas brand wines, like the Arkansas River Valley and Petit Jean Valley. Even if you are not looking for a drink, you should still visit the local attractions such as the Arkansas’ Historic Wine Museum and the Eiffel Tower Park. The Arkansas’ Historic Wine Museum is an establishment dedicated to showing the history of wineries and wine making in Arkansas. The Eiffel Tower Park, a miniature version of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France, acts as a water fountain in a city plaza in Paris, Arkansas. After leaving the cities behind, you climb up to the peak of Mount Magazine, the tallest mountain in Arkansas.

3.16 Grand Prairie Loop:

Distance: 122 miles

If you are looking for a leisurely and relaxing drive over miles of even ground, the Grand Prairie Loop is ideal for novice motorcyclists. If you pass by the town of Scott, you will get to explore the Toltec Mounds Archeological State Park, the ceremonial sites and constructions created by the Toltec Native Americans. Stretched across these peaceful lands are numerous farming communities which specialize in cultivating soybeans and rice.

3.17 Delta Music Ride:

Distance: 281 miles

Running alongside the Mississippi River, the Delta region has a history of popularizing the blues and rockabilly. At the Delta Cultural Center in Helena-West Helena, you can hear broadcasts of the long- running blues radio show “King Biscuit Time.” You can also visit the spot where the club known as Twist burnt to the ground due to a fire that blues player B.B. King witnessed while trying to save his guitar. This region is where rockabilly star Johnny Cash grew up; the Historic Dyess Colony: Johnny Cash Boyhood Home where he was raised has been repaired and is open for visits.

3.18 Bayou Bartholomew/Rohwer Memorial Loop:

Distance: 113 miles

Bayou Bartholomew is the longest bayou in the United States, serving as the boundary between agricultural farmlands and pine tree forests. Due to the farming communities nearby, the bayous have become shallower over time. Now they are only suitable for fishing. Following the loop, you will come across Rohwer Relocation Center National Historic Landmark, an internment camp where Japanese Americans were held during World War II. If you need historical context of the internment camp, you may visit the World War II Japanese American Internment Museum which is part of the Missouri-Pacific Railroad Depot.

4. Parting Words:

The roads and destinations listed above are not the only sights worth seeing while in Arkansas. There are fewer notable highways that can still take you to quaint urban areas full of legends or have you hugging the cliff sides of a treacherous mountain trail. You do not have to spend hours taking pictures at a well-known location to know you had fun on your motorcycle tour. If you keep an eye out for what else is around besides the most popular museums, natural sites, and establishments, you might be pleasantly surprised. Arkansas is a state that combines the rugged environment of the natural world with the raw intensity that comes with pulling the throttle of a motorcycle. But it is not enough to just read about what Arkansas’ famous spots are like. You have to embark on the journey and experience Arkansas’ marvels yourself.